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Assorted Multicolor Tourmalines (Liddicoatite / Fluorliddicoatite) plus Beryls and Chrysoberyls from Madagascar


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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Antsikoza pegmatite, Manapa pegmatite Field, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61601a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Antsikoza pegmatite, Manapa pegmatite Field, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61601b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Antsikoza pegmatite, Manapa pegmatite Field, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61601c.JPG]


No. MAD61601 - $ 900.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Antsikoza pegmatite, Manapa pegmatite Field, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 4.0 x 1.8 x 1.7 cm (miniature)


Liddicoatite is one of the most interesting, colorful and extremely rare Tourmaline species out there. This piece was collected in 2012. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. Here we have a vivid multicolor Tourmaline crystal with a HOT PINK pyramidal termination which grades into various shades of light and dark pink and green throughout. This crystal is gemmy when backlit, and has top luster, with virtually no real damage to speak of. A beautiful and rare Tourmaline crystal. These specimens seem to be dwindling fast, and the pegmatites that are producing them are running dry quickly according to Dr. Federico Pezzotta, who sold me this specimen personally, as he collected it himself in Madagascar.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61602a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61602b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61602c.JPG]


No. MAD61602 - $ 2800.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 6.1 x 3.5 x 2.7 cm (small cabinet)


Liddicoatite is one of the most interesting, colorful and extremely rare Tourmaline species out there. This piece was collected in 2013. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an excellent crystal group with superb form, luster and sharpness, and interesting and rarely seen “tea” color with shades of pink and golden hues depending on the light in which it’s viewed. The Liddicoatite group is certainly gemmy when backlit, despite its thickness, and has excellent luster, with VERY little damage, (I found a spot here and there with a loupe). A beautiful and rare Tourmaline crystal. These specimens seem to be dwindling fast, and the pegmatites that are producing them are running dry quickly according to Dr. Federico Pezzotta, who collected this specimen personally, as he collected it himself in Madagascar.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Anjanabonoina pegmatites, Ambohimanambola Commune, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61603a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Anjanabonoina pegmatites, Ambohimanambola Commune, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61603b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Anjanabonoina pegmatites, Ambohimanambola Commune, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61603c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Anjanabonoina pegmatites, Ambohimanambola Commune, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61603d.JPG]


No. MAD61603 - $ 1100.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz

Locality: Anjanabonoina pegmatites, Ambohimanambola Commune, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 3.6 x 2.7 x 2.3 cm (miniature)
Tourmaline Crystal: 3.4 cm


A RARELY seen matrix specimen of Tourmaline from Madagascar. At the end of 2011, there was a find of some attractive Tourmaline specimens from Madagascar. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals, ESPECIALLY on matrix. Here we have a very attractive and colorful DOUBLY-TERMINATED Liddicoatite Tourmaline with a glowing pink basal termination and a golden-green color in the center. Interestingly, the pink hue runs along the edge of the prism and is concentrated again at the other “stepped” termination, which actually shows a tiny bit of the greenish hue. This crystal has fine luster along the prism, although the basal termination has a matte luster. To top it off, the Tourmaline is sitting on a matrix of Smoky Quartz, which is not common in my experience with these specimens, as the vast majority of them are loose singles. Do not miss out on this lovely miniature display piece.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61604a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61604b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61604c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61604d.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61604e.JPG]


No. MAD61604 - $ 350.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 2.5 x 0.8 x 0.7 cm (thumbnail)


At the end of 2011, there was a find of some attractive Tourmaline specimens from the Sahatany Valley of Madagascar. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an excellent crystal for any Tourmaline collector as it has magnificent form and sharpness with various shades of pink and greenish hues. It’s quite gemmy when backlit, and has top luster, with virtually no real damage to speak of. A great thumbnail for any collector of gem crystals, Tourmalines or minerals of Madagascar.



To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61605a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61605b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61605c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61605d.JPG]


No. MAD61605 - SOLD

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 5.5 x 1.1 x 0.8 cm (small cabinet)


An interestingly colored Liddicoatite Tourmaline from a discovery in 2009 in the Camp Robin area of Madagascar. I know that a lot of Tourmalines are simply labeled as being “Camp Robin”, but I acquired this one directly from Federico Pezzotta, who said it was from Ambohimahasoa. The coloring starts with a RARELY seen yellow pyramidal termination. Yellow is arguably the rarest color seen in Tourmaline, and to find a good sized crystal like this with a yellow termination is not common from any locality. The termination transitions into a soft pinkish hue, and then makes a dramatic shift into a dark golden/reddish-brown to a nearly black hue. You need strong backlighting to see the color in the lower portion of the crystal, but the combination of yellow and golden-brown together is bizarre to be sure. Think of all the Tourmaline crystals you’ve seen, and how often have you come across one with this kind of coloring? Virtually undamaged with good luster and form. It should be noted that this crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite, which is part of the ever re-defined and confusing Tourmaline Group.



To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61606a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61606b.JPG]


No. MAD61606 - $ 225.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 2.6 x 0.3 x 0.3 cm (thumbnail)


A beautiful pink and green gemmy “pencil” of Liddicoatite from the Sahatany Valley. The crystal is doubly-terminated, with one distinct pyramidal termination on one end, and a partial termination on the other end where it appears to have grown against the pocket wall. No damage and a beautiful little colorful example of this interesting material. It should be noted that this crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite, which is part of the ever re-defined and confusing Tourmaline Group.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61607a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61607b.JPG]


No. MAD61607 - $ 200.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 2.2 x 0.3 x 0.3 cm (thumbnail)


A beautiful pink and green gemmy “pencil” of Liddicoatite from the Sahatany Valley. The crystal is doubly-terminated, with one distinct pyramidal termination on one end, and a partial termination on the other end where it appears to have grown against the pocket wall. No damage and a beautiful little colorful example of this interesting material. It should be noted that this crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite, which is part of the ever re-defined and confusing Tourmaline Group.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61608a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61608b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61608c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61608d.JPG]


No. MAD61608 - $ 650.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 3.5 x 2.5 x 2.1 cm (miniature)
Largest Crystal: 1.8


A rarely seen multi-crystal matrix specimen of Liddicoatite from Tsarafara Sud featuring many free-standing sharp, lustrous, gemmy multicolored crystals sitting on a thin slab of Feldspar. The crystals have a pastel yellowish-pink hue at the terminations which grade into a slight yellowish-green zoning and then a tan/bronze tone throughout the rest of the crystals. The combination of the odd coloring and the fact that the crystals are on matrix make for a very enticing and attention-grabbing piece. The main crystals are damage free, though a few of the lesser crystals lying on the matrix are contacted. The three predominant free-standing crystals have wonderful luster, and all of them have different terminations with one showing a basal pinacoid, another showing a pyramidal form, and the third has a modified “stepped” shaped. It should be noted that this specimen was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this piece, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61609a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61609b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61609c.JPG]


No. MAD61609 - $ 1900.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 7.6 x 2.2 x 1.2 cm (small cabinet)


Liddicoatite is one of the most interesting, colorful and extremely rare Tourmaline species out there. This piece was collected in 2013. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an attractive and good sized crystal with superb form, luster and sharpness, and interesting pinkish-golden when backlit depending on the light in which it’s viewed. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the piece is the fact that it is attached to a thin layer of white Feldspar on the back. I wouldn’t necessarily call it a matrix specimen, but the VAST majority of these crystals are loose singles with no associated minerals, so this piece is important for the simple fact that it has another species present. These specimens seem to be dwindling fast, and the pegmatites that are producing them are running dry quickly according to Dr. Federico Pezzotta, who sold this specimen personally, as he collected it himself in Madagascar.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61610a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61610b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61610c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61610d.JPG]


No. MAD61610 - $ 650.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Ambohimahasoa District, Matsiatra Region, Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 4.8 x 1.6 x 0.8 cm (miniature)


An interestingly colored Liddicoatite Tourmaline from a discovery in 2009 in the Camp Robin area of Madagascar. I know that a lot of Tourmalines are simply labeled as being “Camp Robin”, but I acquired this one directly from Federico Pezzotta, who said it was from Ambohimahasoa. The coloring starts with a RARELY seen yellow pyramidal termination. Yellow is arguably the rarest color seen in Tourmaline, and to find a good sized crystal like this with a yellow termination is not common from any locality. The termination transitions into a soft pinkish hue, and then makes a dramatic shift into a dark golden/reddish-brown to a nearly black hue. You need strong backlighting to see the color in the lower portion of the crystal, but the combination of yellow and golden-brown together is bizarre to be sure. Think of all the Tourmaline crystals you’ve seen, and how often have you come across one with this kind of coloring? Only a tiny bit of damage with good luster and form. It should be noted that this crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite, which is part of the ever re-defined and confusing Tourmaline Group.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61611a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61611b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61611c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61611d.JPG]


No. MAD61611 - $ 1600.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tsarafara Sud, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 5.7 x 1.8 x 1.6 cm (small cabinet)


One of the rarely seen “tête noire” / “testa nera” (black head) Tourmalines from Tsarafara Sud. The piece is stout, and it surprisingly passes light, which can be a problem for crystals from Madagascar once they reach this thickness. My two favorite aspects of the piece are the steep, somewhat jagged termination and the fantastic range of colors. First we start with the markedly black color that is only seen on the termination, which appears that it could only be a coating, but if you look closely, the color actually permeates into the crystal itself. With strong backlighting, a faint pinkish-purple hue can be seen beneath the black area. It is starkly contrasted by a soft baby pink hue at the top of the crystal that gives way to a pinkish-yellow then a true yellow color (arguably the most rare color in Tourmalines), but it takes an immediate left turn and instantly changes to a FIERY CHERRY RED hue about ¾ of the way down the crystal. It should be noted that true RED hues are not seen in Tourmalines from Madagascar, they always have some kind of pink or brownish tone, but this one has more of a red color than any other Tourmaline I can remember seeing from Madagascar. The crystal is finished off with a soft pinkish-orange color at the base. Lastly, in the close up photo, you can see a faint purple line of color running along the prism, a strange phenomenon for Tourmaline. No damage that I can see, and what distinctive and beautiful coloring! It should be noted that this crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite which was originally named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. As of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm referring to it as Liddicoatite.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61612a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61612b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61612c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61612d.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61612e.JPG]


No. MAD61612 - $ 450.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) with Quartz

Locality: Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 1.8 x 1.7 x 1.4 cm (thumbnail)


At the end of 2011, there was a find of some attractive Tourmaline specimens from the Sahatany Valley of Madagascar. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an excellent crystal for any Tourmaline collector as it has superb form, luster and sharpness, and a rarely seen orange color on the termination. The rest of the crystal shows shades of pink and greenish hues, but the most important part of the specimen is that fact that it has a bit of attached crystallized Quartz, which is HARD to find in Tourmalines from Madagascar! The Liddicoatite is certainly gemmy when backlit, and has top luster, with virtually no real damage to speak of. A beautiful and rare Tourmaline crystal.

To order this specimen click here




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61613a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61613b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61613c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61613d.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61613e.JPG]


No. MAD61613 - $ 600.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Tamponilapa, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 3.2 x 1.6 x 0.9 cm (miniature)


At the end of 2011, there was a find of some attractive Tourmaline specimens from the Sahatany Valley of Madagascar. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an excellent crystal for any Tourmaline collector as it has superb form, luster and sharpness, and a rarely seen orange color on the termination. The rest of the crystal shows various shades of pink and greenish hues. It’s certainly gemmy when backlit, and has top luster, with virtually no real damage to speak of. A beautiful and rare Tourmaline crystal.

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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Vohitrakanga pegmatite, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61614a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Vohitrakanga pegmatite, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61614b.JPG]


No. MAD61614 - $ 450.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Vohitrakanga pegmatite, Betafo District, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 3.6 x 0.7 x 0.7 cm (miniature)


One of the rarely seen “tête noire” / “testa nera” (black head) Tourmalines from Vohitrakanga. It has a notably interesting “extra virgin olive oil” greenish color with a distinct black color on the pyramidal termination. Near the base of the crystal, the slightest amount of pink can be seen. The prism is remarkably lustrous, bright and glassy and internally, there’s plenty of gemminess, though it’s not water-clear. This is a rare color for Tourmaline, especially with the interesting “black head”, not unlike Tourmalines I’ve seen from Elba Island, Italy. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America.

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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61615a.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61615b.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61615c.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61615d.JPG] Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite) from Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61615e.JPG]


No. MAD61615 - $ 1250.00

Tourmaline (Fluor-Liddicoatite)

Locality: Camp Robin area, Fianarantsoa Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 4.5 x 1.1 x 1.1 cm (miniature)


Liddicoatite is one of the most interesting, colorful and extremely rare Tourmaline species out there. This piece was collected in 2013. This crystal was sold to me as being Liddicoatite, but as of 2011, Liddicoatite is a “non-approved” mineral species (it’s now called Fluor-Liddicoatite), but for the purposes of this crystal, I'm going to refer to it as Liddicoatite. There are more localities for Liddicoatite in Madagascar than any other country worldwide. Originally, it was named after the gemologist Richard Liddicoat, the former president of the Gemological Institute of America. Many of you are probably familiar with the great multi-color polished slabs of Tourmaline from Madagascar that show a wonderful array of patterns and color arrangements, but typically Liddicoatite is not often seen in euhedral, well-terminated crystals. This specimen is an attractive and good sized crystal with superb form, luster and sharpness, and interesting pinkish-golden hues when backlit depending on the light in which it’s viewed. The most intriguing aspect of the piece (though hard to see in the photos), is that when the piece is lit from the side, if you view the termination at the correct angle, it shows a strange and distinctive dark inky-blue-purple color in the form of a light coating on the surface of the termination. These specimens seem to be dwindling fast, and the pegmatites that are producing them are running dry quickly according to Dr. Federico Pezzotta, who sold this specimen personally, as he collected it himself in Madagascar.

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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Beryl (variety: “Aquamarine”) from Ambatosoratra pegmatite, Ambatosoratra Commune, Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61616a.JPG] Beryl (variety: “Aquamarine”) from Ambatosoratra pegmatite, Ambatosoratra Commune, Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61616b.JPG] Beryl (variety: “Aquamarine”) from Ambatosoratra pegmatite, Ambatosoratra Commune, Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61616c.JPG]


No. MAD61616 - $ 700.00

Beryl (variety: “Aquamarine”)

Locality: Ambatosoratra pegmatite, Ambatosoratra Commune, Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 5.5 x 1.3 x 1.2 cm (small cabinet)


Well-crystallized Aquamarine is not common from Madagascar in my experience, and this wonderful prismatic crystal is not only well-formed, but has a gorgeous rich blue color. It’s not washed out or “grey” in appearance, but rather a vibrant sky blue. It may be difficult to see in the photos, but the termination is completely transparent, even though it has a slightly etched appearance. Conversely, the prism faces are quite smooth and glassy. No real damage that I can see, and it’s just better than the majority of the Aquamarines I’ve seen from Madagascar, which often are opaque, dull, and not nearly as well-crystallized as this one.



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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61617a.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61617b.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61617c.JPG]


No. MAD61617 - $ 400.00

Beryl

Locality: Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 5.2 x 0.8 x 0.7 cm (small cabinet)


From an isolated, small pocket that came out in 2011, this was one of only a handful of crystals recovered according to my source who acquired them directly at the locality. These crystals are not quite blue, not quite green, but somewhere in between. I won’t call them Aquamarines, but they do have an interesting color. To me, the most important fact about this piece is that it’s so sharp and well-formed. Beryl crystals from Madagascar can often be etched, dull or poorly crystallized, and this one is a fine example of an elongated hexagonal prism with first and second order pyramidal modifications on the termination. It should be noted that the piece is doubly-terminated, with a recrystallized base. The topmost portion of the piece is quite gemmy, nearly transparent, while the rest of the crystal has a gentle translucency. The back of the termination on this crystal is contacted (not damage, but rather a spot where another crystal once grew), but it doesn’t show from the display side. A curious and unusual Beryl crystal for anybody who collects gem crystals, Beryls in general, or minerals from Madagascar.



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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61618a.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61618b.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61618c.JPG]


No. MAD61618 - $ 600.00

Beryl

Locality: Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 4.2 x 1.3 x 0.8 cm (miniature)


From an isolated, small pocket that came out in 2011, this was one of only a handful of crystals recovered according to my source who acquired them directly at the locality. These crystals are not quite blue, not quite green, but somewhere in between. I won’t call them Aquamarines, but they do have an interesting color. To me, the most important fact about this piece is that it’s so sharp and well-formed. Beryl crystals from Madagascar can often be etched, dull or poorly crystallized, and this one is a fine example featuring a pair of sharp hexagonal prisms with first and second order pyramidal modifications on the terminations of both crystals. This piece is not only doubly-terminated, but is actually a complete “floater” as BOTH crystals on the specimen have terminations, and no visible point of contact. The pyramidal terminations of each crystals are quite gemmy, nearly transparent, while the rest of the specimen has a gentle translucency. No damage and really attractive. A curious and unusual Beryl crystal for anybody who collects gem crystals, Beryls in general, or minerals from Madagascar.

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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61619a.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61619b.JPG] Beryl from Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar [./mad616/mad61619c.JPG]


No. MAD61619 - $ 500.00

Beryl

Locality: Estatoby, Sahatany Valley, Sahatany Pegmatite Field, Vakinankaratra Region, Antananarivo Province, Madagascar

Specimen Size: 5.1 x 0.8 x 0.7 cm (small cabinet)


From an isolated, small pocket that came out in 2011, this was one of only a handful of crystals recovered according to my source who acquired them directly at the locality. These crystals are not quite blue, not quite green, but somewhere in between. I won’t call them Aquamarines, but they do have an interesting color. To me, the most important fact about this piece is that it’s so sharp and well-formed. Beryl crystals from Madagascar can often be etched, dull or poorly crystallized, and this one is a fine example of an elongated hexagonal prism with first and second order pyramidal modifications on the termination. It should be noted that the piece is doubly-terminated, with a recrystallized base. The topmost portion of the piece is quite gemmy, nearly transparent, while the rest of the crystal has a gentle translucency. The back of the termination on this crystal has an indentation where there was incomplete growth, but it’s not damaged or even contacted, but has a small bit of Feldspar that kept it from fulling forming. A curious and unusual Beryl crystal for anybody who collects gem crystals, Beryls in general, or minerals from Madagascar.



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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61620a.JPG] Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61620b.JPG] Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61620c.JPG] Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61620d.JPG]


No. MAD61620 - $ 550.00

Chrysoberyl

Locality: Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar

Specimen Size: 2.3 x 1.7 x 1.1 cm (thumbnail)


Chrysoberyl is a species that is well known to collectors, but good specimens are only known from a handful of localities in the world. Typically, specimens from Brazil were the only good representation of Chrysoberyl on the market, unless one was lucky enough to obtain a fine Alexandrite from the Urals of Russia. This “floater” specimen is from an exciting discovery in Madagascar (early 2013). It shows a lovely vibrant yellow-green color along with sharp, lustrous, well-formed faces and slight translucency. The piece is actually twinned showing the classic "sixling" form for which Chrysoberyls are known. The habit and size of this piece is typical from the locality, and certainly worthwhile for any thumbnail collector to pick up as these specimens are hard to come by on the market. Enjoy.

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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61621a.JPG] Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61621b.JPG] Chrysoberyl from Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar [./mad616/mad61621c.JPG]


No. MAD61621 - $ 650.00

Chrysoberyl

Locality: Ambatondrazaka District, Alaotra-Mangoro Region, Toamasina Province (Tamatave), Madagascar

Specimen Size: 3.5 x 2.2 x 0.8 cm (miniature)


Chrysoberyl is a species that is well known to collectors, but good specimens are only known from a handful of localities in the world. Typically, specimens from Brazil were the only good representation of Chrysoberyl on the market, unless one was lucky enough to obtain a fine Alexandrite from the Urals of Russia. This piece is from an exciting discovery in Madagascar (early 2013). It shows a lovely vibrant yellow-green color along with sharp, lustrous, well-formed faces and decent gemminess. The piece is actually twinned showing the classic "sixling" form for which Chrysoberyls are known. The habit of this specimen is typical from the locality, but it’s larger than nearly every other piece I’ve seen, and certainly worthwhile for any collector to pick up as these specimens are hard to come by on the market.

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